As of midnight tonight, The Whole Story for Boys will officially launch!

This whole past week we’ve been celebrating the pre-launch period with a great sale (including the ability to make up the difference if you’ve already bought one version of the course but want to upgrade) and a 5-day series to help parents feel prepared to talk to their kids about sex, puberty, and all the awkwardness that comes with those topics.

It’s Rebecca here on the blog today, and to wrap it all up I thought I’d share some thoughts I had while coordinating The Whole Story for boys. Since I was the one who managed the girls’ version of the course, I was also in charge of the big-picture planning and creation for this version, too.

1. Guys have it pretty easy when it comes to puberty

My entire life I’ve believed that both guys and girls have it equal when it comes to the trials of puberty. No, we really don’t. Girls have it 10 times worse. I scoured pediatric health sites trying to find evidence that guys go through something–anything–that is comparable to what girls do. There’s nothing.

Did you know most guys don’t even really notice puberty starting? Like they notice little things, but nothing as climactic as getting your first period. Everywhere I read, the most embarrassing things guys have to deal with are body odor (girls also have that, by the way), voice cracks (really not that big a deal compared to being worried about someone noticing your enlarged nipples), and spontaneous erections (still not as bad as a period, sorry guys). The biggest concern that parents raised with us about their sons and puberty was if they were a late bloomer or an early bloomer. But guess what? Girls have to deal with that, too!

As well, they just don’t go through as much. For the girl’s course, we had an entire unit on just periods alone. And then a whole unit on the other changes that come with puberty!

The guys have just one unit on the changes that come with puberty. And at first, I panicked. “How are we going to make a course if I’m missing a whole unit’s worth of materials?”

But then we talked to Sheldon about it (the face of The Whole Story for Boys) and he had a real passion and desire to dedicate a whole unit to character development and studying what it means to be a man of God. We looked back over the comments and emails and thought, “That’s a great idea!” And it’s one of my favourite units of this course.

Here’s the thing: girls need a ton of information. They need to have emergency kits prepared, they need to feel prepared for their period months before it comes for the first time because once stuff starts happening, it happens fast. But for guys, puberty is much more gradual. They need the information, too, but what they really need is a space for good, honest conversation.

It’s a lot easier to get girls to talk about their hopes and dreams and who they want to become when they grow up than it is with boys. It’s easier to get girls to talk to you when you’re driving in the car or doing dishes after dinner. Boys, when they do talk, often find it difficult to naturally cross over into emotional communication.

So the goal for The Whole Story for Boys was this: Give the boys all the information that they need (like in the girl’s version), but then also challenge them and their fathers to have real, meaningful conversations about not just puberty but what kind of person they are growing up to be. Give a place for those much-needed conversations to happen, since they’re often difficult to start.

These young boys are rapidly becoming young men, and having conversations about where God has gifted them, how you pray God will use them, and the not-as-fun stuff like the dangers of getting roped into the world of pornography will prepare them to not just get older, but to really grow up.

TWS fb ad3 - What We Learned Making the Boy's Version of The Whole Story

Are you terrified to give your kids “the talk?”

Last year we created The Whole Story for Girls–an online video-based course that helped moms tell their daughters about sex, puberty, and growing up.

And now we’re launching the boy’s version! 

The course officially launches TONIGHT at midnight EST. But if you enroll now, you can get the course at a discounted price (the girl’s course is on sale right now, too!) and you’ll get a chance to help us shape what materials we create next for the course.

2. It’s incredibly difficult to not accidentally use innuendo

These are some actual titles that I wrote and then realized, “Maybe not a great idea”:

  • How to Handle Your Erections
  • Sex: Talking About the Hard Stuff
  • Getting a Handle on Masturbation

Yup. So glad I had proofreaders.

3. I needed a lot of outside help

I have no idea where to start when it comes to teaching guys how to clean uncircumcised penises. That particular gem was brought up when we had men go through the course to find things we were missing or needed to include. I also have no idea if there is a specific kind of underwear guys during puberty could wear to help keep unwanted erections in check. Thankfully, we are surrounded by a bunch of amazing men who were able to review the course and say, “Yep! Looks good!” or “Yeah no, not so much.”

After a few rounds of it being proofed, we finally got the finished product. But the VIP version isn’t quite finished yet because during this launch season we’ve been asking people who buy the course to tell us: What do you want additional help with that the course doesn’t cover? We’ll be adding that unit in the next month or so, and we’re excited to see what it is that you want!

To finish off for today I want to remind you of this: you don’t have to have it all together when talking to your kids about sex, puberty, and growing up. What they really need is just a parent they can talk to and who has shown them, “I want to hear not only about the good stuff, but the bad stuff, too.”

But having the right information really really helps, too.

Our mom did an awesome job of being an easy person to talk to. The information side? Not so much. That’s really what inspired us to create The Whole Story. And if you haven’t heard us talking about what we learned after it was too late when it came to puberty, watch this video (it’s pretty funny):

Thank you so much for your encouragement over this last week especially–it’s been wonderful seeing your comments and getting your feedback these last few days.

I want to leave you today with this question:

What is your prayer for your children as they grow up? What kind of giftings do you see already at work in them? Let’s brag about our kids for a bit in the comments below! 

Rebecca Head Shot 200 175 - What We Learned Making the Boy's Version of The Whole StoryRebecca Gregoire Lindenbach is a 23-year-old Canadian blogger/author and the daughter of Sheila Wray Gregoire. Married since 2015, she is passionate about helping others challenge the status quo and live for more, whether in their relationships, their educational or occupational goals, or their walks with God. And yes, like her mother, she also knits.
41nfuDUq 3L. SL160  - What We Learned Making the Boy's Version of The Whole StoryCheck out Rebecca's book and course:
  • Why I Didn't Rebel. Ever wondered why some kids rebel and some don't? Or do you believe rebellion is inevitable? Rebecca interviewed 25 young adults and dove into psychology research to find out: what makes some kids rebel, and some stay on the straight-and-narrow?
  • The Whole Story: Not-So-Scary Talks about Sex, Puberty, and Growing Up. Scared to talk to your daughter about puberty? Rebecca and her sister Katie want to do the hard part for you. This course is designed to start conversations to bring you closer together and strengthen your mother-daughter bond while giving your daughter all the information she needs as she becomes a woman.
Teenage rebellion doesn't need to be a part of your family's story. You can help your kids live for more! Get the first chapter of Why I Didn't Rebel for free here!

Interested in checking out The Whole Story?

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